woman


Aesthete: Hi Tiarn, thanks for spending a moment with us between your superhuman schedule. On that note, would you mind filling the Aesthete audience in on what it is you're up to at the moment? Tell us a little about your day to day as well as your creative ventures.

 

Tiarn: You are most welcome, I hear you're a bit of a superwoman when it comes to busy schedules too, so thanks for having me! 

If you can picture a stove with 20 burners, and 20 different pots on them, all simultaneously reaching boiling point...that's pretty much where I've been at lately.

 
I have lots of different creative projects on the go right now; art commissions and custom orders, a really soul-igniting collaboration with an inspiring woman from Colorado, and I recently had the opportunity to go to Brisbane and perform at the Australian Poetry Slam State Finals which was amazing, especially since it was my third time ever performing poetry in front of people! 

I've also started working on some hand-crafted educational resources, tutor students in English and Literacy from my home office/studio, study an education degree, raise one wild little boy, and funnily enough, just this afternoon I resigned from my day job in early childhood education to spend more time on my Tiarn Florence ventures. So, it's all happening!

 

A: Thinking back five years, was your life much the same, or starkly contrasted? Who was Tiarn before she was 'Tiarn Florence'?

T: Five years ago, wow, I was an entirely different person living an entirely different life. I was actually completely lost, to be entirely honest with you.

I lived in a share house in Brisbane, enrolled in a creative writing degree at University (which I totally took for granted), dated a pretty lovely but equally as lost boy, smoked way too much, and didn't take nearly enough care of myself physically, mentally, or spiritually. So, definitely a stark contrast to the life I lead now.

I've always been very creative, imaginative, and sensitive to the energies of the planet and those around me so I just hadn't learnt how to regulate and honour that yet...or how to enforce the boundaries I needed in order to preserve my own energy.


A: You've gained notoriety and a committed following on your social media particularly for your poetry and stream of consciousness pieces of late. What does social media demand from a 21st century artist, and in turn what opportunities does it present?


T: Notoriety, haha, I'm not sure about that! But I've definitely enjoyed connecting with people through social media, despite my lack of tech-skills and tendency to go off-the-grid and live hermit-style every now and then.

I think that is probably the most demanding and challenging part of being a 21st Century artist, to me at least; the pressure to be consistently sharing and putting myself out there to the world, and the fact that there are so many other amazingly talented people out there.

It has been both a pro and a con in my experience; I love reaching out and sharing the love with other artists and creatives but have also felt a lot of that "every man for himself" kinda vibe, like a lot of it is ego-driven. I'm not out here for followers or "likes", I'd much rather genuinely connect with a few then receive tokenistic "likes" from people who wouldn't even read an instagram caption.

But I've been lucky enough to find those people; artists, and women, and mothers, and men who are all embracing this duality of masculine and feminine to truly create magic within their own lives and who want to share that love and magic with the world.

It has been such a huge part of me actually accepting and believing in myself as an artist. My entire 'Tiarn Florence' account and business was built from the encouragement of Instagram friends, and being self conscious of "harassing" my friends and family with art stuff on my personal account haha.


A: You seem to gravitate toward themes of the feminine, sex, motherhood and open-wounded 'letters to an ex', all thrust into the world with a notable level of vulnerability and candidness. Where, amongst your current body of work, did 'Woman' come into being? Is there any particular significance to this work which prompted you to pursue it in film format before any others?

T: Well, like I mention in the poem 'Woman', it took me a really long time to feel comfortable and strong in myself as a woman. I felt as though femininity made me smaller, weaker, and less valid than others around me. Most of my friends were/are male and I've definitely grown up feeling that huge difference between the way boys and girls are treated. I think most, if not all females would have at least one stand-out experience that made them have similar realisations.

It wasn't until I became a mother that I really honoured and celebrated my body for the amazing things that it can do, I became empowered, and it is that raw and divine femininity that I aim to celebrate through a lot of my work. Sex is another one of those things that I feel was a bit oppressive throughout my life, and it still seems a bit "taboo" for women to be openly celebrating their right to enjoy and take ownership of their own sexuality. Our human experience is vulnerable and candid in itself, so I just offer my own experiences and thoughts as a kind of commentary on the human condition, I suppose. 

'Woman', however, took me by surprise. It just began writing itself in my head and I couldn't stop it. It started as a piece about feminism with the first verse, but turns out I actually needed to bleed my entire life story out as some sort of unbridled catharsis. It was my first poem that ever came out as spoken word before being written, and I think that it marks a point in my life where I just unapologetically accepted myself as both a woman and an artist so it seemed fitting it should be my introduction to film format as well.

 

A: We've thoroughly enjoyed the entire process of directing and producing this film alongside you. Can you give an overview for our audience as to the general mood-boarding and concepts involved in the shoot? Which elements of the film do you think truly intertwined with the nerve endings of the piece itself?

T: It has been so wonderful and I couldn't have chosen anyone better for this collaboration! I already had a pretty vivid idea of how I wanted this piece captured, which you embodied so well, I must add.

Blood, fire, water, and the forest were all important motifs to carry throughout the film because I really wanted to portray that whole rising-from-the-ashes kind of liberation I felt throughout my own struggle to empowerment. I feel like your idea of vines as shackles really resonated with what I wanted to get across, and I knew I wanted to get into the water as it felt symbolic of a cleansing (even though it was f*cking freezing!).

Mood boarding just centred around those motifs, a white dress, the forest where a lot of my own healing has taken place, and the vulnerability and power of being naked in nature. I just feel so grateful to have worked alongside someone who understood and valued my vision so highly, even when I wasn't even sure how to express it.


A: Very kind of you, it was definitely our pleasure though! And so, Tiarn, the million dollar question: What's Next?


 

 

T: At this point, anything could happen! But I know that I'll be pouring every ounce of my heart and soul into that soul-igniting collaboration I spoke of, creating more art, growing my business, hopefully sharing more spoken word videos, and offering tutoring to students who don't necessarily love words as much as I do.

We'll just have to see how it all unfolds, but I know it will be magical!